Biomedical research institute
     
    You are here: Home / Departments / Infection, Immunity and Inflammation

    Department of Infection, Immunity and Inflammation (3I)

    •  

    Department Director: Florence NIEDERGANG

    Deputy Directors: Clarisse BERLIOZ-TORRENT & Agnès FOUET

     

    The main research axes of this Department are:

    - The biology of cell populations of the innate and adaptive immune system: T cells, dendritic cells, macrophages, B cells and neutrophils; their roles in cancer, autoimmune, inflammatory and infectious diseases, using human samples, mouse and non-human primate experimental models.

    - Host-pathogen (retroviruses, bacteria, parasites) interactions: the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert the functions of infected cells and in particular signaling, subcellular trafficking and cytoskeleton dynamics, the barrier function of epithelial and endothelial cells, the contribution of phagocytic cells.

    Two young group leaders were recently appointed, Cécile Arrieumerlou after the 2013 international call, who is supported by an ANR @TTRACTION grant and Catherine Lavazec, selected by the 2013 ATIP-AVENIR start program of CNRS and Inserm.

     

    Major axes of research

    Within the Department, three main axes are delineated:

     

    * Immunology, from immune cells to disease:

    (Allanore, Bomsel, Bourdoulous, Cheynier, Donnadieu-Randriamampita, Hosmalin, Lucas, Niedergang, Witko-Sarsat-Mouthon)

    These teams tackle basic questions on the biology (ontogeny, homeostasis, activation, migration, cell signaling, functions) of cell populations of the innate and adaptive immune systems: T and B cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and neutrophils. They are also interested in applying their knowledge to pathological conditions such as infections, cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory diseases.

     

    ** Host interactions with bacteria and parasites:

    (Arrieumerlou, Bourdoulous, Chiche, Langsley, Lavazec, Niedergang, Tardieux-Poyart)

    These teams focus on host interactions with bacteria and parasites: entry, replication and intracellular fate of microorganisms. A common major theme is to dissect the mechanisms used by pathogens to subvert the functions of infected cells and in particular signaling, subcellular trafficking and cytoskeleton dynamics. In addition, the barrier function of epithelial and endothelial cells, as well as the contribution of phagocytic cells, is examined in vitro and in animal models. Surface receptors for pathogens are examined and the polymorphism of some of them is analyzed.

     

    *** Host-retrovirus interactions (Retrhost):

    (Bénichou, Berlioz-Emiliani, Bomsel, Cheynier, Hosmalin, Niedergang, Margottin-Pique)

    These teams are interested in the molecular pathogenesis of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1 and 2) and type 1 Human T cell Leukemia Virus (HTLV-1). Current projects address questions on the early and late steps of the replicative cycle, on restriction factors and viral escape and on cytokine response to viral infection in primary cell populations, especially macrophages. They will also study the mechanisms leading to the deleterious hyperactivation of the immune system and how it either controls or favors HIV and HTLV infections.